Methamphetamine-induced stereotypies in
newly-hatched decerebrated domestic chicks

by
Kabai P, Liker A, Csillag A
Department of Ecology,
University of Veterinary Science,
Budapest, Hungary.
pkabai@ns.univet.hu
Neurochem Res 1999 Dec; 24(12):1563-9


ABSTRACT

Metamphetamine in high dose has been reported to induce stereotypic behavior of abnormal form in the pigeon and domestic chick. A number of reports suggested that the target of metamphetamine was the paleostriatal complex, the highest motor center of the avian brain. The present study tested this hypothesis by treating newly-hatched domestic chicks with high dose of metamphetamine (10 mg/kg b.w.) after complete decerebration or sham operation. Stereotypic mandibulations were observed both in sham-operated and in decerebrated birds in similar form following methamphetamine treatment. The results suggested that brainstem pattern generators remain responsive to dopaminergic stimuli in the absence of the main telencephalic (striatal) targets.
Stereotypies
Neurotoxicity
VTA/glutamate
CNS stimulants
Self-medication
Worms on speed
Dopamine uptake
Canine narcolepsy
Appetite suppressants
Methamphetamine psychosis
Methamphetamine/narcolepsy
Amphetamine withdrawal/depression



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